Women in Confucian thought

Many traditional commentators and modern scholars have debated over the precise meaning of the passage, and whether Confucius referred to all women or just certain groups of women.

Women in Qing Dynasty

The Qing government praised demonstrations of virtue and, to prove their commitment to morality, discouraged officials and scholars from visiting courtesans.

Status of Women in Song Dynasty

While it is commonly argued that the decline of the status of women from the Song dynasty to the Qing was due to the rise of neo-Confucianism, others have proposed that the cause was also more complex, a result of various social, political, legal, economic, and cultural forces, for example changes in inheritance practices and social structure.

Status of Women in Tang Dynasty

The Tang dynasty has been described as a golden age for women, in contrast to the Neo-Confucianism of the later Song dynasty that saw practices like foot-binding, widow suicide, and widow chastity become socially normative. This...

Role of Women in Zhou Dynasty

By the Zhou dynasty, Chinese society was decidedly patriarchal, with female and male social roles determined by a strict, feudal hierarchy. The foundation for enforced division of women and...

Prostitution in China

China has roughly 4 million to 6 million sex workers, according to a 2010 World Health Organization paper, and they can be found in every city, working out of hair salons, karaoke bars, hotels, massage parlors, bars, barber shops and on the street.

How China’s market economy has fuelled a prostitution boom

The consensus is that there are between four and 10 million sex workers in China. One thing is certain: prostitution has been on the rise in China since 1982.

Inside Hong Kong’s High-Rise Houses of Prostitution: Who’s Really in Charge?

Hong Kong is, from time to time, referenced by the lascivious faction of the international online community, as a hotspot for sex—whether via a night out in Lan Kwai Fong, the streets of Yau Ma Tei, or miss148.com.

Sexist job ads discriminate against women in China

Out of all national civil service jobs that were reviewed so far this year, 19% included the terms “men only,” “men preferred,” or “suitable for men.” There was just one instance of a job ad that required the applicant to be a woman.

Why China’s women are feigning subservience to win husbands

Chinese women have been an integral part of the formal economy for far longer than many of their Western counterparts, yet many men have a tendency – some would say a cultural obligation – to reject women with equivalent education and salaries.

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